The February-March 2010 issue of SolarPro Magazine features an interview with IREC’s Jane Weissman about workforce development and quality training programs. 

Read the interview to find out about the standards being set by NABCEP,  North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners, and IREC, Interstate Renewable Energy Council.
 
 
In Monday's Toronto Star, Tyler Hamilton wrote about the cost of skilled labor for solar installations: 

"There will be high expectations and key milestones for clean technologies in 2010, which kicks off a decade that will witness large-scale transformation of the world's energy sector. Close to home, thousands of homeowners and businesses will be looking to install solar photovoltaic systems to take advantage of Ontario's new feed-in-tariff program.The cost of solar gear has slowly fallen over the past few years, but half the cost of an installed system still goes toward labour.  Expect to see more solar products on the market touted as do-it-yourself, offering a sort of a snap-together roofing system that has all the wiring and inverters embedded into solar panels. Once installed, all that's required is the hiring of a certified electrician to inspect the system and make sure it's correctly connected to the grid. Lowe's home improvement stores in California, for example, began selling such a product in December. Could an offering in Ontario be in the works?"
Until such a time, and well afterward, Ontario's solar rush will need well-trained Ontarian's to design and install photovoltaic arrays. Such labor accounts for 27% of the required 40% domestic content requirement.  Ontario Solar Academy is leading the way, providing first-rate hands-on training previously only offered south of the border!  Our inaugural 5-Day Training  begins February 22
 
 
Ontario Solar Academy will host its inaugural 5-Day PV Design _ Installation Course in Toronto, Ontario, February 22-26.  This intensive session, featuring both classroom and (indoor) hands-on experiential learning, is the first of its kind to meet the demand of the new solar boom in Ontario, Canada. Ontario has become the fastest growing North American solar market, after California and New Jersey, in response to the Ontario government's aggressive Feed In Tariiff (FIT) Program. Solar Academy International is currently scheduled to host this course on a monthly basis and enrollment is limited to only 20 participants per course to ensure optimum teacher / student interaction. The course is based on NABCEP Guidelines and is similar in structure to courses offered in California and New Jersey that meet the needs of solar companies seeking to train their staff and individuals seeking entry into the solar workforce. Find out more here www.solaracademy.ca.
 
 
Popular new program attracts more than 2,200 applications 
Press Release from the OPA


Toronto, ON, December 16, 2009 - Seven hundred Ontarians from Ottawa to Windsor to Thunder Bay – including a member of the popular band Barenaked Ladies – will be celebrating a green holiday season after being the first to receive offers to generate renewable electricity under the province’s new feed-in tariff program. 

The new microFIT program encourages the development of small-scale renewable energy (10 kilowatts or less) from a diverse range of producers, including homeowners, schools, farmers and small businesses. It is part of a broader Ontario feed-in tariff program (FIT), the most comprehensive program of its kind in North America. FIT is also aimed at encouraging community-owned and aboriginal-led projects. 

“It's a thrill to be able to power my own lights while at the same time contributing to my city's electrical needs,” said Jim Creeggan, bassist for the band Barenaked Ladies. “Now that the microFIT program is up and running, it makes solar a realistic option for more households.  With enough homeowners on board, communities will have a greater impact on where our power is coming from.  I'm glad solar power is getting out of the fringe and into the mainstream.” 

The FIT program, one of the cornerstones of the Green Energy Act, provides stable, guaranteed pricing to renewable energy producers of all sizes. It supports the province’s commitment to eliminate dirty coal-fired generation by the end of 2014 — the single largest climate change initiative in Canada. FIT and other initiatives under the Green Energy Act will support the creation of 50,000 “green collar” jobs.

“The new microFIT program literally brings power to the people,” said Gerry Phillips, Minister of Energy and Infrastructure. “It allows homeowners, farmers, schools and Mom and Pop businesses to help power our future and get paid for it, while investing in a new era of ‘green collar’ jobs and expertise.” 

“The tremendous initial response to the feed-in tariff signals a strong future for renewable energy in Ontario,” said Ontario Power Authority CEO Colin Andersen. “We’ve cut the red tape and made it simpler for ordinary Ontarians to become electricity producers and they’ve raced to embrace green energy.” 

The Ontario Power Authority has received nearly 1,200 microFIT applications since the program began accepting applications on October 1, mostly for residential roof-top solar power systems. These proposed projects have a combined capacity of about 8.6 megawatts (MW), enough to power about 1,000 average homes. 

Between October 1 when the program launched and December 1, the Ontario Power Authority also received about 1,000 applications for projects over 10 kilowatts (kW). This large number of applications ensures there will be more than enough high-quality projects to deliver the 2,500 MW of renewable energy earmarked for the first round of the FIT program. These larger scale FIT applications are still being assessed. 

The Ontario Power Authority estimates that the first FIT projects will generate in excess of $5 billion in investments in manufacturing, design, construction and engineering and lead to the creation of thousands of new jobs. 

The Ontario Power Authority is responsible for ensuring a reliable, sustainable supply of electricity for Ontario. Its four key areas of focus are: planning the power system for the long term, leading and co-ordinating conservation initiatives across the province, ensuring development of needed generation resources, and supporting the continued evolution of the electricity sector.